Finding the News, How Has New Media Effected Journalism?

Ross Johnson's picture
Instructor
6/26/2012

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This past week I had the opportunity to consult with a national news publication. Their problem is all too familiar. Like most traditional publications worldwide, their subscription base is dwindling and advertisers are unwilling to put money into print advertising. They have a website but it doesn't generate enough money to support their business.

Reinventing The News

In the design space, everyone is waiting for someone to reinvent modern news. This of course, has yet to happen. The "successful" online news models are average at best, the most common being the sale of online advertising. But what worked for print isn't as effective as the web. Users confess to hating online advertising slightly less than subscription based services (the second most common model.) The least adopted is the "pay per article" approach that tries to turn news into a journalistic version of iTunes.

Like all complex problems, the issue is multifaceted. First, many claim to prefer print based news while also confessing to have canceled their subscriptions. It seems people think one way and behave another. Second, the methods of revenue generation are damaging to user experiences. Advertisements are intrusive, paywalls are unfriendly and content seems to be an afterthought. It seems the business of news and the users who will consume it are at odds.

What Are Your Thoughts?

So I ask you, how do you currently consume the news? Do you read it online? If so, how do you come across it? Did a friend share it with you or did you visit a website proactively? Second, how could a newspaper make money in a way that didn't both you?

Comments & Feedback

Student

For me I usually get my news on the internet. It's not because the I like the internet better though. Like you said in this post, "many claim to prefer print based news while also confessing to have canceled their subscriptions." This isn't them being hypocrits or lying about it, it's because times are changing and people need to keep up with the times. My family went from getting the paper everyday, to getting the paper three or four times a week, to just getting it on the weekends, and then eventually cancelling the subsription. I personally do like the paper better. I feel this way because this is how it has always been and I like the feel of just holding the paper in my hand. Yes I know the phone is always on you and is easier to read articles on the go or look things up in the article but reading the news in the paper just seems more normal to me right now at least. Like I said I read the news on my phone just because it's always there but when I'm walking around campus and I pass the newspaper trays I will pick one up ocassionally, usually the State News, because I like to know what's going on around the state community that I typically wouldn't search for an article online. 

Student

When I consider my news consumption habits, I would say I'm split between reading it online and in print.  However, pretty much the only printed news I read is the Sunday paper.  I get it delivered, just on Sundays, and I like to have it in front of me to read as opposed to being online.  I think I enjoy it partially because of the ritual.   I also really like to look through the advertisments that accompany it, and my purchasing behavior is definately influenced by it.  I also really enjoy and utilize the coupons that come in the bundle.

As for news online, I would say I probably read more news from my phone than on my computer, although I do still occasionally read news on my laptop or home computer.  On my phone, I have several apps that I check regularly for news, including MLive, Advertising Age, and an ESPN sports news app.  I usually check these in the morning, before I get out of bed. 

Secondary sources for the news I consume include news stories shared by a friend, or news "trending articles" that earn my interest and my click on social media platforms such as Facebook.  I honestly don't usually ever visit a website proactively.  I think a newspaper could make money in a way that didn't bother people by charging a small amount for an online subscription, by granting access to their printed content online.  The Lansing State Journal sends me emails that feature 5 top stories, and if I'd like to read more I can click on a link and put in my user name and password and freely navigate the site.  I would think newspapers could make money by getting people to subscribe to a cheaper, online version of the news.

Student

Currently I get most of my news online with the occasional TV news or newspaper.  Most of the news I read comes from Yahoo.com or is posted on Facebook.  I have quite a few news organizations that I "liked" on Facebook, so I see their posts on my news feed.  

 

I presume that you meant to ask how the newspaper could make money in a way that did not bother me.  Newspapers actually do not bother me; I actually quite enjoy reading them.  The only problem comes with availability.  I have to make a conscious effort to go grab a newspaper, but online news is with me wherever I have wifi.

Student

I currently consume news from the internet for the most part. I read articles online, I barely rarely pick up a news paper it is just more convient to read things online because in this generation we tend to spend a lot of our time on the internet so therefore we read the news that way. I also get a lot of my news from the tv I tend to watch TV a lot and from there I see the news and what is going on. I get a lot of my information also from social media because I see a lot of people online talking about different things so that is a diffferent site to see news online. So for the most part all my news come from online.

Student

Admitedly, I really get most of my news from friend's who share the articles on facebook. I'm really planning to make an effort to regularly visit cnn.com or some news site to stay up to date, but lately I haven't taken those steps. The only website that I have visited proactively is businessweek, which I have also ceased to do as of recent. It is not that I can't find the motivation to visit a news site, but rather that the thought is truly out of my mind. Aside from laziness, my absence of news interest could come from the fact that my family is very involved in news. While I don't watch any TV, my mother and father are constantly watching shows such as Nancy Grace, Jane Valez, and other popular news media outlets. I'm surrounded by the voices of these characters and the stories they're covering, and I typically enjoy a few episodes with my parents as well.

While I can own up to some exposure to news media outlets, I also admit that I very rarely ever touch a newspaper. I can't really find the urge unless the paper is free, or is already paid for ( Ex: statenews). But as I'm getting older, I'm beginning to feel as though I will buy into newspapers. I suppose I can't offer a way for newspapers to make money without bothering me, as they don't annoy me and I plan on buying more soon.

Student

Currently I get all my news online, mostly through Google News and Twitter. I never watch the news on TV unless its "mock news" like the Colbert Report or if it's something big that I want to watch live (i.e. Supreme Court ruling on health care).  

I think the only way for newspapers to make money is by having it through a website or tablets with advertisements.

What they could do is have a watered down version of the newspaper available for free with advertisements that could be read online, on tablets, and smartphones, then they could have a paid-for complete version of their newspaper that could be available with out any advertisements for their hard core readers that would also be available through subscriptions on the same devices. The two versions would have the same basic news information about the world, the US, and Politics. However, the arts, style, opinions, business, and technology would be offered exclusively through the paid-for version. 

Student

I currently consume close to 90% of my news content online, the other 10% I will get from print, but even that is only because I can get a paper for free whenever I'm on campus. I typically don't get much news from TV because it isn't on my time and is therefore almost always inconevient to fit into my schedule. I use the opera.com news portal as my homepage which lets me chhose which publications i want to see headlines from and where i want them orientated on the page whenever it loads. I think that more people want "their" news in the forms that most easily integrate with heir daily lives, and for newspapers to survive they have to address this and adapt into the forms that people want. They'll have to learn how to put ther content into the hands of their readers, who in this day and age are using computers, tablets, and phones while mopping up their morning coffee spills with those newspapers. There was an interesting concept by the Chicago Tribune of distributing a basic color e-reader with subscriptions to the paper, but there are additional cost issues with such a plan.   

Student

I think on this topic, my most experience was last year, during the London riots, where I was following the events with the help of Twitter. I noticed that newspapers used regular people, twitter users, and pictures from them about the topic too, because a lot of the reporters had difficulty keeping up to where the new riots where happening. The newspapers where widely influenced by social media: they were also displaying the messages of the rioters, and their view on things. I think there!s a very good ad from the Guardian, which shows how social media infuences regular reporters. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iP88d87AV1k

Student

The way that I currently consume the most of my news is online. The way that I get it is through twitter. But, that is mainly celebrity news. I do watch the news to get news news. Newspapers can make more money by making there newspapers be mobile. Most people get there news online now of days and having the newspaper on there would help sales for a newspaper company.

Student

I have a favorite news network I watch the news on when I do watch it on television, which is sometimes. I like ABC World News (at 6:30PM), Nightline (at 11:35PM), and ABC World News Now (early mornings for people insomniac habits like me). Normally I don't go out of my way to watch these shows, but when I do watch the news, it's always national as opposed to local, and when I know it's on, I will turn it on as I do other things. I also use Twitter a lot for news sources. I follow TMZ and E! Online for silly celebrity crap news, and I follow ABC and Nightline and Christiane Amanpour and people like that for breaking current news. Twitter in general is a great way to be tipped off to what's happening *now* so you can go and read further if you so choose. I think more and more people are seeking headline news like that, and seem to prefer the "opt-in" type of news. 

Student

nice article and really hit home base and reality

Student

I was browsing reddit this week and stumbled upon (no pun intended) a funny meme that stated "browsing reddit today means I don't have to read the news tomorrow". More and more often I find myself reading breaking news FIRST through reddit. Online publications may waste precious time choosing a proper format and dialogue for their stories where was redditors simply tell it as it is with a simple post. I think thats newspapers would do well making money by offering significant coupons that made their purchase worthwhile. They have to offer something to tear me away when imagur is down.

 

By the way I could NOT find the meme for the link of me. If anyone else does please post it. Thanks!

Student

I'm not a big fan of the news, mostly because it's very depressing, but I do like to know what's going on in the world. I've never been a fan of the newspaper, unless it was for comics. Now I catch up on the news mostly online. I'm on Twitter most of the time, and my followers will catch me up on the latest news. If I want more details, I just reserach the topic on my own. Even my grandmother, who is very old school, has started to use the internet more and more to catch up on the latest news. She still receives newspapers, but she hardly reads them anymore. Everyone is pretty much attached to their phones these days, and because mostly only smartphones are available, the news is more available to people. I don't even know people who actually watch the news on TV anymore. My dad doesn't get off of work by the time the news comes on at 5. By the time it comes on again, he's in bed. So his smartphone plays a big part in the way he gets his news. There's applications and mobile websites now, so it's no surprise that more and more people are straying away from the traditional print news, and even television. Even social media has played a big part in how the news is given to people. A lot of stories make it onto Facebook or Twitter before the news stations can get their hands on it. I wouldn't be surprised in a few years, if newspapers just died out completely. 

Student

I would say that I consume news mostly online. However, I prefer to have an actual newspaper in hand. For me, its easier on the eyes. I hate staring at a computer sceen for long periods of time, and I'm not always able to be online. I can get news through my phone but, I dont get the same experience staring at a tiny screen as I would with a newspaper. When it comes to advertising in newspapers it doesnt really bug me like it does online. Newspaper ads tend to be more thoughful and entertaining than your average ad online.

Student

I get most of my news online; the only time I dont get it from online is when I'm sitting at the breakfast table on saturday morning and pick up the paper when my grandpa finishes reading it. However, I just mainly glance at the front pages of every cover and then go to the comics and movie section. Online however i consume more news. I setup my igoogle account to get the top 15 news articles from BBC. After that i will occasionaly go back to the bbc site to do more through investigation on what the site has to offer across it's various news articles. I trust BBC more than I trust any of the american news sites.

Aside from this, I get a good portion of news from my friends on facebook. They are redditers, so I get sent various reddit links through facebook chat and I read up on certain news events. The good thing about reddit is that it has it's news posted from real news sites, and it has room for comments so you can get other people's opinions.

  The problem with most newspapers is that it's written by the american media, which is why their online counterparts aren't fair very well either, since most people don't trust american news anymore. Since people don't trust the american news they aren't going to waste their money or time reading their information. They instead will search for a less biased and more news filled story from an overseas news site or get their information from a social site like reddit or facebook. 

Student

I read most of the news that I do read online, most of the time on blog sites or just from word of mouth. For instance I will hear someone talking about a current event via twitter and from there I will actually go ahead and research it myself, that is how I get most of my news. Newspapers are going out of style just because it is becoming harder to actually get a hard copy of something where as since mostly everything is avaliable online you do not have to worry about only getting the half. Online is the best way to go when it comes to getting my news sources now a days.

Student

I get most of my news online and through my social media apps. I think this is the best way for me because I receive notifications for what's going on in the world as soon as it is posted. I was a newspaper girl but I switched to relying on my apps because I found myself stuck with too many newspapers and I wasn't too great with the going green campaign and that became a hassle. I think newspapers could make more money if they made people pay for online subscriptions to gain access to the most exclusive stories. That means they should only higer the best of the best to give people what they need in order to subscribe. 

Student

I don’t really consider myself a daily “news consumer”. I try and catch up on a daily basis by visiting websites like MSN, Yahoo!, and the Detroit Free Press online, but I don’t make it a priority of mine. To be honest, I hear about a lot of the news in the world today through social media like Twitter and Facebook. A lot of the people that I follow share the same interests as me and retweet networks like CNN, which is a global news provider.

I do enjoy and appreciate a hard copy newspaper from time to time. For instance, if I’m sitting at a bus station on campus, I’ll grab a free copy of the State news, USA Today, or the Lansing State Journal to see what is current in the news world. I would consider paying for a subscription to a magazine or newspaper if it elicits a particular interest in me, such as Sports Illustrated, ESPN the magazine, or something like that. My mom is actually a subscriber to PEOPLE magazine, and I look at those from time to time.

I actually don’t mind advertisements in newspapers and magazines. They don’t really get in the way like online pop-up advertisements, or advertisements on mobile phones- which annoy me very much. I think that print ads are the most effective way to reach each company’s prospective audiences. Although they may not be the most cost effective method, it is really the only way that companies can advertise in newspapers and magazines.

Student

I currently consume my news online, and occasionly pick up a newspaper when I have nothing to access online news. Sometimes I see stories on twitter and facebook and I mainly go directly to my sites. I mostly read ESPN.com and football news related sites so I just access it on my phone. If I want to know something newsworthy other than sports, I usually watch CNN, CNBC, or go to freep or detnews.com. As long as there aren't pop up ads on a site ads don't bother me. I respect advertising and I just accept it as a part of the news business.

Student

I get pretty much all of my news on the internet. It's easy and fast, especially with my smartphone. Normally I check a few of the same sites daily, such as CNN, ESPN, and a local news page. Being a big sports fan, its easy to find rumors and breaking news on Twitter. That often leads me to searching the internet for more information than I can find in a 140 character tweet. Now that I think about it more, Twitter really is the place where breaking news spreads quickly. It can be used as a good tool to find what is happening in the world today. Realistically, the easiest way for a newspaper to try and make money is to require a subscription to use their online site. The Lansing State Journal did that recently, and I haven't been able to use their webpage since as I don't have a subscription. Maybe if subscriptions became a universal thing with online sites for newspapers, it would be easier to get people to subscribe.

Student

I consume most of my news online. It is easy to access and updated frequently. I will look at online articles that are shared by my friends via social media if they interest me and are not related to apps like the Yahoo! news apps. I hate those. I refuse to read an article by clicking the link. I will search for it and find it in a manner where it is not linked to a Facebook app.

I do appreciate having a hard copy of a newspaper if there is a particularly releveant, nice, or personal photograph or if the article is somehow related to myself, MSU, my team, etc. It is nice to have a physical momento. 

I don't have a problem paying for a newspaper subscription if I enjoy the content. I do not want to pay for online articles. I don't get to keep anything, and they are frequently updated and changed. I am ok with ads for online stuff as long as I don't have to pay for them as well. I would be willing to pay for an online subscription to a newspaper or media source if I was able to get a hard copy upon request as part of my subscription. It is a bit of a hyprocrisy because while I get most of my news online, I don't want to pay for it if it isn't also available in hard copy. This is also a hard line because paper copies are a waste if only a few people request or want them.

Student

I get all of my news via my USA Today app and AdWeek.com.  I love the USA Today App because of its' minimal ads and contextually relevant ads. Adweek's Ads, surprisingly, are getting to be too much. One must fill out a multiple choice question to read the article! It's ridiculous! I do think contextually relevant ads are the best alternative. It might be more costly for the advertiser, but it reaps the most rewards to advertise to people who actually care about the product.

Student

As a former journalism major, I was all to aware of dwindling news readership. Hence why I chose to pay for a student membership to the NYT and WSJ. However, recently I have switched to online subscriptions with my iPad. It is cost-effective and I like the platforms they have for the iPad. However, I really can't stand the advertising. Today, I went to read some articles on my iPad and on the health section their was an advertisement for McDonalds. I thought perhaps the advertisements should at least be aligned with the ethics of the company. However, the NYT really suffered as they did not require a pay for membership online newspaper  in comparison to the WSJ. Perhaps they need big investors like McDonalds. 

Student

Location Based Services & Mobile Marketing – Do you have a smartphone? Well, most likely you will soon. But regardless of that this week its time to experiment with location-based checking and mobile marketing. Take a look at what’s out there with mobile advertising. Take a look at sites likeFoursquare, Scavenger, and Gowalla and see what you think. Try them out. Check in. 

Assignment: Experiment with mobile and location-based services and write about your experience. Join some location-based sites, and add your friends. Do your research and write a 250+ word post on what you learned on location-based services and mobile marketing. Be sure to reference your NMDL book and a specific resource you liked in this chapter. 

Student

I have to say that I enjoy reading news online more than print, mostly because you can filter to only bring up the articles that you care to read, and because it's constantly updated. Online ads are really annoying, but I would still rather deal with those than pay for news from other sources. Most of the time I will go to specific websites to find news, but if I am looking for more general topics, I'll go to Google News and search for whatever.

Although printed news is in a decline, I think that people will continue to pay for their local newspapers. As more and more online resources become available, people may stop paying for the specific types of newspapers and magazines, but I think that local papers and print ads won't decline that much because it's harder to reach locally online, and print ads are relatively cheap.

Student

My news comes almost exclusively from the Internet. There are certain news sites that I visit regulary, such as ESPN.com for sports, and the Chicago Tribue website for my hometown Chicago news. I'll usually only visit national news sites like CNN or MSNBC if a friend or family member suggest I check out a story. Other than that, it's pretty limited. I like online news because its easier to handle than a newspaper. I've always had problems holding the newspaper the right way to make reading as easy as possible, but with online news, I don't have to worry about it.

Student

I get the news in what I cosider four different ways. What I mean is I get my local news by watching the TV and the local news stations, my political news from comedy central's The Daily Show and the Colbert Report because sadly I feel that those shows are the least bias and political journalist are all bias, Yahoo! for my national news and then Twitter and Sports Center for sports. Journalists are showing more about their opinion more than what the news actually is. I have never been one to read the newspaper I prefer to get the news from the internet and the TV.

Student

I hate to say it but I find myself consuming news via the internet.  I have such a fondness of reading the paper and flipping through a magazine for so many reasons. As we continue on into the future of everything going digital, it truly is much easier to access many websites at once.  We all have a habit of multi-tasking and being stimulated by music, social media, and the news all at once and that's harder to do when reading a newspaper and focusing on one thing at a time.  

Another reason I think it's more popular to consume news online is it is faster to get different opinions and check out different news sources in a shorter period of time than to go out and find different papers (and pay for the content) when it's easier to read online and form your own opinion/get a clearer story.

Much of the time I come across my news via Twitter.  I follow many different news sites/organizations on Twitter and it allows to me to look through and see what's happening in the news as well as what's happening with my friends/employers/family/etc all at once.  

Student

I currently consume the news through many different resrouces, my favorite being twitter. I follow a lot of news organizations and get everything from there. It is usually always on my iPhone. I come across it from my timeline, the news resources, and people tweeting links and articles. 

A newspaper could make money by having a weekly paper, where everyone could read it once a week. I feel like small town newspapers do the best because they're all about local news. 

Student

When I read the news paper I read it on online sites or my phone. I have a CNN app. and also a NY Times app. I enjoy how easy it is to read digitally. I rarely ever read the news paper in print although sometime it is nice for the change up. I work and Panera Bread and we have numerous newspapers for sale so sometimes I read the ones that people leave behind. Digital newspapers could still make money for advertising. It would be much easier to see advertising on a computer and tablet versus small phone.

Student

Generally when I read news or hear news it is from my Iphone 'Newstand' app or from the radio.  I enjoy reading paper in print and the stories seem more alive.  What I mean by that is the stories not only have more picture but you also know that you are getting the information from a reliable source.  The internet is useful and newspapers are almost entirely online anyways.  Most people will get a subscription to a magazine just for the online content that you cannot access for free.  Personally when I read an article from my phone I only skim and I get the jist of the story.  When I read from a newspaper I almost always finish the article.  If we didn't get newspapers with our student ID I would miss an awful lot of news.

Student

I normally consume the news from simply watching television or on my phone with the different news app provided! I think with the way current things are with social media people really arent into newpapaers as they use to be. I typically only pick up a new paper if someone like my grandma ask's me too! IF i see something interesting on the front page I MIGHT look at it or purchase it for my self but I cant remember the last time I even did that! I also hear alot of news from the radio so I feel if its something of importance it will get to me in some sort of way!

Student

This has been an ever-changing process in my life, as well as others I'm sure. I find that word of mouth these days in one of the main, and sometimes only, ways I will take the time to read something. If someone in one of my classes, a professor, colleague, classmate, mentor, etc. passes information along to me I can basically assume I will be interested in it. This is especially true in our graduate program. We are constantly sharing links to websites, publications etc. That alone is enough to keep me busy reading all day, every day. On top of that you get family members, repeated newsletters from blogs you've subscribed to and enjoyed reading in the past, etc. everyone wants to get your attention and keep it. I have yet to find a site, even if I've book marked it or subscribed to it, that I continuously think to go on and check. I'm bombarded with too many new ones every day. Reading one article that someone posted on their Facebook status could ultimately link me to 10 other ones, which also are linking me to 10 other ones...and so on. There's just not enough time in the day. The way news sites link everything similar together, as it makes sense for easy access, can also be extremely overwhelming and cause me to just exit the site all together.

This goes back to the orginal discussion we've all had about less is more. I think newspapers need to keep in mind that similar to professors, they might be an expert on a subject or on all subjects, but people aren't typically seeking out these sources to get to the level that they are. Or if they are it's not going to be right in that one sitting. I don't know what the answer is to generating revenue from this, I often ask myself the same question. This is all really great and up-and-coming, but how does one create revenue from it? Everything is instant, free, current and linked to millions of other things just like it. How can you compete with that? It makes me think of free versus paid for apps. I automatically ignore and click out of the apps that cost money, I don't even want to see them. I cannot think of one example where someone could convince me to pay for an app. Again, maybe if "all my friends were doing it" and it seemed worth it for a one time fee. But this has yet to happen.

Student

Before coming to college I used to read most of the news off a newspaper since our family had montly subscription to The Straits Times of Singapore. It's the best newspaper company that Singapore has and they do have more quality articles in it. But since then I have rarely read a newspaper, a hard copy I mean. Now I read the news online, since it's free and I have immediate access to it. Some of the articles that I would like to read require subscription and a fee. I can understand that quality requires payments and this is a good way to change the platform, as more people move in to the digital media and away from traditional newspapers. Sites like the New York Times and Time magazine have this policy where you can only read limited amount of articles per month and when you go over the amount you would need a subscription plan to have unlimited access to their articles. 

Student

I prefer to read the enws online.  I suscribe to the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal online as well as recieving their twitter updates.  I find it easier to read online, I was never a fan of reading the newspapers, maybe because they are too big and hard to hold (for me at least).  I am glad that all (if not most) news outlets have their publications online and in print so suscribers have options.

Student

I think journalists and members of the news media are at a crossroads. We are entering an era where the content and coverage that was once only available through a subscription service is now available from countless outlets for free. The range of quality between the different outlets varies greatly but the different options struggle because there is no consistency between what certain sites are charging, making the choice to find coverage from a different, cheap or free source is very easy. For example, the New York Times has a 10-article-per-month limit that expands to unlimited with a number of different subsription options. However, The Washington Post still has an unlimited amount of online articles that do not require a subscription of any kind. Furthermore, websites like Politico and The Hunnfington Post offer similar amounts of coverage with no worries about print subsriptions.

 

These kind of contradictions are found at all levels of news media (i.e. AnnArbor.com has free access to their online articles but subscriptions are still available for the tangible papers) and until there is a consistent model there will no need for news consumers to waste time and money on sites that require log ins and subscriptions. Personally, I hope that more news outlets adopt the approach of The New York Times and start charging for the quality content they put out. Maybe I'm biased as a former journalist for a newspaper that had its customer base dwindle, but I'll always long for the days where quality content on the national and local levels was valued. I would not be bothered to pay for news subsciptions, but requiring subscriptions will not be a viable option until the quality of the free alternatives is significantly less than the paid options.

Instructor

I'm a voracious news consumer - who was probably one of the few students at MSU to subscribe to multiple print newspapers when in school (Detroit Free Press, New York Times, Wall Street Journal - gotta love the student discounts).

I no longer subscribe to any print newspapers and instead get all my news online. I pay for my New York Times subscription, which also works on tablets and smartphones. To get most news, I either visit the actual newspaper sites throughout the day, subscribe to newspaper RSS feeds/email lists or by following the outlet on social media.

Good journalism costs money and I'm happy to fund it by paying a subscription or with a micropayment model - but only if the outlet offers something worthwhile for the price. The NY Times does some very cool digital reporting (from online video to infographics/Flash animations) that make paying the $25/mo subscription fee worthwhile - but if it were just the straight text from the paper itself, I wouldn't find it as compelling of an offer. 

Student

I love reading the news in print. A paper and a coffee makes me morning a little bit easier but with social media networks like twitter where anything and everything that is happening around the world at that moment is already out there. Now a days I find it easier to just go to my twitter or my favorite sites and blogs for the news. I would prefer newspapers but its just not realistic anymore, if I receive my paper that morning, I already know the full scoop of what the front page is about before reading it. I dont know how the newspaper can really survive in print. Maybe have only a number of locations to have actual papers but place the entire paper online with a subscription.

Student

The only print newspaper I really read is The State News, if I'm on campus and happen to pick one up. I typically get my news from The Huffington Post since it is my favorite source, and I have an app for it on my smartphone with a widget for my homepage to see what articles are new. I came across The Huffington Post through stumbleupon, I was directed there many times and loved the articles so I started to follow the news there. I also usually find out about news through facebook and read articles my friends have posted or look it up news on my own after seeing statuses about it. I think that online ads are a fine way for an online newspaper to make money. As long as they don't have sound, they don't annoy me, I can ignore them quite easily. I think they could also have special features and articles for paid memberships and as long as their special material was great enough, people would pay and they could make money that way.

Student

I usually get news from 3 places online: Yahoo.com, ESPN.com, and USA Today (Phone App). I began reading news on Yahoo! because they were my internet provider and USA Today because it is one of the top-rated news apps for the iPhone. Occasionally someone shares a news article with me but typically I get my news by visiting these websites proactively. The only advertising I would be comfortable with is banner advertising. I would not be willing to watch a 15 second video or pay for an article individually. If I felt that a news service provided unique value I would consider paying for a subscription.   

Student

I read both. I work at Bob Evans, so there is always an LSJ floating around there, but when I'm just bored online, I will also read articles featured on my mail providers home page. They make it easy for me to read entertaining stories and it's no hassle. Sometimes I will read articles that people reccommend on Facebook, but that is rare. Usually I just stumble across it on accident. As far as a newspaper making money-beats me. This world is going digital and noone wants to pay for whatthey can get free. I was going to pursure a journalism carreer and this is the #2 reason I did not. (#1 is that I realzied how suck it is to write ALLL the time.. ahem blogging :P)

Student

I primarily consume the news on television. I'm busy throughout the day, so I rarely take the time out to look for the news online. Furthermore, (depending on the story) it seems as if the the online news sources don't have all of the facts, just what they have collected so far. In terms of organization, presentation and my own convenience the television is the best way for me to consume the news.

However if there is a big story, for instance the Jerry Sandusky trial, I will seek online mediums my own for details. There have been times where I'm online (facebook/twitter) and my newsfeed or timeline will have an interesting article that one of my friends posted. Depending on how interesting the topic is I will click and peruse throught the article. I come across news from many different sources (ie Thatgrapejuice, cnn, foxnews, tmz etc) like this. 

Unfortunately, advertising is everywhere and there is no getting away from it. However, it may be possible for the newspapers to make money through merchandising. Instead of focusing so much on selling advertising space, maybe newspapers could sell t-shirts, mugs, stationery, etc as an alternative way to generate revenue. 

Student

Currently, I usually consume my news online. I will periodically watch the news on television as well, but I am not as proactive about it as I am when comes to chekcing out current events on the internet. There are certain websites that I read on a daily basis, including Yahoo! and CNN. I have been looking at these sites daily for so long, that I don't even remember when I first starting doing it. I look at these resources because I find the information they are covering to interesting, accurate, and I just plain like them. Occasionally, I'll get links to information from my friends as well. Sometimes, I stumble upon links they have posted on Facebook or Twitter, and other times they'll send something directly to me either through text or email.

Honestly, the way newspapers advertise has never bothered me. I simply don't read them because I can find information online faster and more effectively. I feel like by the time I'm reading something in a newspaper, I could have read about it hours previously online. However, I do know some people who are bothered by various newspaper's advertising techniques, and what I've gathered a few pieces of intel from them. For one, many of them find the ads placed in newspapers to be ugly, or they take up a whole page, so they'll just skip them entirely. Another issue is that they feel some of the ads placed have nothing to do with them. The things I would say to newspapers to remedy this is to be selective about which ads you run, and be selective about how and where you place these ads within the paper as well. I think this would solve a world of problems for them in terms of advertising.

Student

I consume my news in a few different ways. I do read news online, however, this is mainly because I have moved multiple times in the past couple years and have avoided subscriptions and address changes. I usually turn to the web for national and world news, but still pick up the print copy of local newspapers when I see them and even when I am visiting my hometown. Typically, I seek out news myself, browsing The New York Times, USA Today, and CNN websites to find out what is going on in the world. I also use television as a main news source. With the many 24-hour news channels, I am able to flip on the TV and make dinner or fold laundry while I listen to current and developing stories.

The transition from printed newspapers to online newspapers is challenging. As a viewer of online news, and as someone who still appreciates print and printed news, I have to confess that I, too, find online advertising annoying and an interruption. However, I understand the need for it, and I think online users need to pick their poison – if you aren’t going to subscribe to print versions, you should be willing to pay for a subscription online; if you aren’t willing to pay for online subscriptions, you need to also understand that online advertisements are there to help fund the news organizations’ efforts to report news and make it accessible to you. 

Student

I would say I get my news from a lot of different types of media. I lean towards whatever is the most convenient at the time so it changes on my mood and what I'm doing. When I'm on campus, I always pick up a copy of the State News because it's a lot easier to read in print than to open my laptop, bring up MSU's horrible Wi-fi, then go to the site 3 minutes after I get the urge to read the news. With the print copy, all I have to do is reach and grab it out of my backpack. I also usually carry around my iPod Touch which I have a couple news apps for so that's probably the main way I get my news. Unfortunately for the newspaper companies I follow, my apps don't have advertising and I didn't have to pay for any of them so essentially I'm getting my news for free. Good news for me, bad news for all my journalism major friends. Ads in newspapers, or on the side of a website, or screens on smartphones and tablets really don't bother me at all so I think that's a good way for newspapers to continue making money. There are a lot of people out there that still like going and buying an actual newspaper even though they own a laptop or tablet that they could get the information on, so print advertising is still an option in my opinion.

Student

I consume news in multiple ways – online, print, TV, and radio.

Online - I check my Yahoo e-mail several times a day, and that allows me to come across interesting articles on the site. If there’s a specific story of interest, I’ll conduct a Google search and read whatever article happens to come up. I’m not usually particular about the publication.

Print - I subscribe to two magazines – Time and Entertainment Weekly. The publications provide more in-depth coverage of recent news and entertainment stories. Occasionally, I’ll read them online, but I usually take a hard copy to bed because a magazine is obviously lighter and more compact that, say, a laptop or a tablet. In addition, I’ll read print publications if they are free and easily accessible, like The State News, City Pulse, and Revue.

TV - I usually watch the NBC Nightly News if I’m home at 6:30pm. My decision to watch has to do with the fact that I like Brian Williams. So, if NBC news isn’t broadcast on a particular night, I’m unlikely to watch CBS or ABC because I don’t have the same affinity for their talent. I’ll also watch “AC360” on CNN if I want in depth analysis of the latest stories and I'm home when it's on. Like Williams, I enjoy Anderson Cooper’s demeanor.

Radio - I often have NPR playing at home and in the car. Headlines are broadcast at the top of the hour, so that provides a decent overview of the top stories. 
I appreciate that the radio allows me to do two things at once – I can listen while I’m on the computer, in the bathroom, cooking, driving, etc.

I admit that I do find online ads annoying. I realize sponsors are needed just as they are on TV and radio and in print. And yet, I have little tolerance. I’ll close an ad immediately if it pops up while I'm reading an article online, and I’ll click off a YouTube video if I first have to watch a commercial. 

I’m probably more accepting of ads on "old media" - TV, radio, print - because they have been in existence my entire life. The Internet, however, is a newer medium, so it somehow seems less acceptable. I’m sure many people feel this way, and that puts advertisers in a tough position. I honestly have no idea how online adverting can be done so it’s not intrusive. Good luck to those trying to find a solution. 

 

Student

I don't read news a lot. If I read news, I will search in Google and read the news which I am interested in. Actually, I care about the news itself instead of its publishers. I seldom buy newspapers, because I think reading newspapers waste a lot of time. I think the way newspapers can make money from advertisements is the sponsors just print the ads on newpapers, but they don't have a good measurement to test its effect. However, when sponsors put their ads on websites, they can easily tell how many people read their ads, that is, they have a measurement to capture the results. Actually, I think the majority of people don't like ads, so they don't have the motivation to click the ads.

Student

The most freqent way I consume the news is online. I check Google News the most because I like how they have it broken down in categories, so I can see top stories depending on whether I want to look at sports, health, or entertainment. I also look at MLive for local news, but I don't like the way they have it laid out and find it confusing to navigate, so I've gotten away from that a little bit. I tend to be proactive about visiting Google News, because I rarely read the newspaper and am generally at school or work during the times when the news is on TV. 

Newspaper advertising doesn't generally bother me unless it consumes too much space. I don't mind when I'm looking at a news site and there are a few ads on the sides of the article. I don't like popup ads, and don't think that would be a good idea for newspapers to advertise and try and bring in revenue, because it will drive consumers away. It's hard to come up with a way for newspapers to continue to make money, but I think they should definitely stick within their target audience or try to appeal to a niche market where certain advertisements would be appreciate and not seen as annoying.

Student

I belong to the group of people who enjoy reading news in print version, while stop subscription. Now, I read news online, through twitter or some news website I like. I will subscribe news from websites I like and read them through email subscription.

I was annoyed by the pop-up advertisement, which, I think, will interrupt my reading. However, I like advertisement that are relevant to me. For example, when I was reading the news about marketing strategies, the advertisement on the head of the website is about SAS software. I think it is quite relevant and I click it to know more about that software. Some on-line advertisement is relevant to reader's interest and preference. I think, it is more effective.

Student

My main source of current news is television. Since I'm around it all day at the fitness facilities I manage this is the most convenient. RARELY will I ever even look at a newspaper unless I desire more off beat stories, especially the WSJ. I do read in-length magazine articles and news that will never make it mainstream primarily in my field of work, athletic training. My on-line reading is a more in depth of what was on television during the day. My Yahoo Homepage is also where I get obscure news stories, human interest, etc. Today I have been reading in-depth on line about the Obama-care passage. This includes following every link present.

In reference to how could a newspaper make money I believe print needs to be more exclusive to attract readers. Create a niche format that only comes in print and directs to their web-site version. In the end, this is a tough call because if the trend continues the younger generation will be the one that puts local papers out of buiness since they never read print and are totally immersed in technology and the social media.