Gender Wars and Social Inequality

Dave Linabury's picture
Instructor
2/13/2014
Blog, Twitter

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If you’re anything but a straight, white person, filling out Web forms that ask for personal information can give one pause. If you’re Cuban-American, you may have to decide whether or not you should fill out Black or Hispanic as the forms rarely allow for both. And what if you’re mixed race?

It becomes even more problematic for individuals who are not straight or do not identify as male or female. 

The same holds true for people who do not identify as “single, married, divorced” or the awkward “It’s complicated”. What if you’re a gay married couple and want to identify as such (gay-married) to prevent others from assuming you are married to the opposite gender (or for political or rights reasons)? Basically, entire groups of people are being dumped into “Other” for most of their identity. We can do better.
Are there other ways of allowing folks who may live on the fringe of society to self identify properly if they wish to? Yes. For starters, let’s do away with drop menus for these type of options. Let’s try things like combo boxes which are like drop menus, except they allow you to type in your own choices if you find that the majority options just don’t do it for you.
Combo Box
On a related note, I ran across a tool today called Twee-Q that analyzes your Twitter profile to see if you are evenly retweeting males and females. The issue is, most people tend to retweet males more (especially males). I was happy to see I scored an 8.8 out of 10 which meant I was tweeting 53% males to 47% females. Not perfect, but not bad.
Twee-Q
When you are writing your posts, retweeting others or filling out forms, does gender inequality enter your head? How about race or sexual orientation? Should it? Let me know your thoughts below. 

Comments & Feedback

Student

While using social media, i never think about gender inequality. When i write posts to the public, add pictures, or comment on material, i never stop to think, " what message am i sending other than what is inside the textbox". The truth is, is that when i use social media, i am writing to my entire social network. As a female, i am guessing that women constitute the majority of my network, but my mind is never targeting them. Regretfully, when i use social media, i am sending a message to my community that manipulates how i want my network to view me. Subconciously, i may want women and men to think differently of me, but speaking to only one gender, or the other is never my intention. When i think about what i am going to post, i always know that everyone, male and female, will see it.  

Student

I have not personally felt discriminated against when filling out a drop down selection, but I have a friend who has. She was offended by the fact that their was no native american option in her drop down menu. Granted, this was a few years ago, and she didn't have a tantrum over it, but the lack of native american representation on the site she was using was enough to create a lasting impression on her.

 

Student

When filling out a form I think gender inequality, race and sexual orientation cross my mind subconsciously.  Its clear that when they ask for this information they're using it as a way to size people up. Places of employment or places that offer specific services can use this as a method finding where someone is a potentially best fit or it can used as a method of discrimination.  To be honest its hard to think of alternative methods of obtaining vital information for whatever reason. Its up the people asking you to fill out the forms not to be discriminatory. 

Student

It is so interesting to me to see that there are plenty of races are living in the same society. Im from China, which the majority is Han, so it is kind new to me to realize that the drop box thing cause problems. I think differnet people have different perspective towards it. 

Student

I first want to discuss the statistic about retweeting males and females.  I am guilty for retweeting almost exclusively males.  I honestly cannot remember the last female that I retweeted, partly because I follow a lot of famous athletes, which are predominately male.  I really like the idea about being able to type your own reponse into a text box if the options do not match.  With states' laws changing, I think this is a good idea when it comes to filling out forms as such. I personally do not have trouble with this ( I am a white male), but I could see how frusterating this could be.

Student

Personally, I’ve never felt discriminated when filling out any sort of forms. I can easily identify myself as: Female, Caucasian, and Straight.  But this doesn’t mean that I think the forms are fair. There’s inequality across the board when it comes to surveys and forms. One of my best friends falls under the race categories of Black/African American, Asian and Pacific Islander. When surveys ask to “mark one of the follow” I think it’s beyond discriminated. No one should have to resort to marking “other” just to make it easier; that goes to race, gender and sexual orientation.

I did the Twee-Q analysis and I received a Twee-Q of 4, favoring females. I don’t think about whether a person is male or female when I’m tweeting (or race/sexual orientation for that matter) I retweet or reply if I relate, think their tweet is funny, etc. A lot of a the time I am responding to my best friends, who happen to be female, but I don’t purposely discriminate. 

 

Student

 

I personally have not had issues when filling out forms, due to being a straight white female, but I have spoken about it with friends who do have trouble.  A friend of mine is Egyptian, and upon filling out forms he is forced to choose “caucasian" or “other"—which does not describe who he is at all.  Considering the rapid growth of immigration and multi-culturals, it is surprising that those creating forms are so behind. Image how many races choose “other”. I assume that does not give very accurate descriptions of the people that are filling out these forms.  If those asking their audience to complete the form would give the option of filling in their response they would receive more accurate data as to who their audience is.  As for retweeting, I think that has much to do with the topics that are being talked about.  I would consider myself to be pretty neutral when tweeting from my personal twitter account, but when businesses are retweeting their followers they should be more consciencious of which gender they are favoring. 

Student

When I use social media, I do not take gender into account when I retweet or post on twitter of Facebook.  I do fit the white female demographic so it is normally pretty easy for me to fill out the drop down menus, but I do realize how few choices there are. I think that sites need to reconsider their definitions of race, marital status, and gender now that the world and its norms have changed. It is not fair for the people who have to compromise who they are in order to fill out an online survey. I believe that there should at least be a fill in the blank option. 

It makes sense that males are more likely to retweet other male's tweets especially because they can relate to them. I find it interesting that there is an app for this because this would never have crossed my mind. I am still curious as to what the app does with the accounts that are neither associated with a male nor a female.

Student

When i do surveys for classes and i pause for a question they ask us because its pretty riduculuous if you are not white. U.S. is basically a melting pot nation and especially i'm Asian American i sometimes get offended by the questions they ask us. Everytime when i do sometime of survey or tweet about something i generally think about race issues and geneder inequality. Like i'm pretty sure some people has to click the ckeckbox "other" because there aren't any more options for them to choose. Especially, its kind of sad that still some companies prefer male rather then female and i think that has to stop immediately. 

Student

I know there are reasons gender, ethnicity etc. are asked on forms but honestly I think the want society has to label everyone so specifically is a little ridiculous. Everytime these questions are asked is it really always necessary? The details of what sex someone is attracted to, or what gender someone identifies as and even ones race should not effect any type of qualifications towards something in the first place so that information in many circumstances should be irrelevant. In the future the cases where one could argue these questions are necessary are going to have a much harder time categorizing anyone. Our melting pot of a country is only becoming more so as time goes by.

            As for the retweeting subject, I certainly don’t respond to males more than females, but Im not at all surprised that this is the norm. Gender inequality is still a huge issue and it is found everywhere. I wouldn’t expect social media to be an exception.

 

 

 

 

Student

I think the issue of people retweeting more male users has very little to do with gender inequality. I know for myself and my close friends the individuals we retweet has very little to do with gender and rather is based solely on content.  I am sure there are outliers to this, but I don’t believe that gender is something most people factor in when retweeting others.  I actually calculated my score and saw that the majority, although I don’t have many, of my retweets are from male users.  This didn’t surprise me as most of the people I follow are political and sports figures which tend to be more heavily male.  

Student

This is a topic that I've honestly never really thought about before.  And I'm actually a little embarrassed to admit that.  Just because I haven't had a problem finding answers to these questions when I fill out forms online, doesn't mean that it isn't an issue and is definitely something I'll start paying more attention to.  I think that if a person setting up these questionnaires really does want and value accurate, in depth information, this should be a main focus for them.  If not doing away with drop-down boxes all together, at least include an option for "other" that would allow a person to then type in their own identifying term in a text-entry box.

Student

In regards to filling out personal information, I think that if someone who is setting up the site is taking the time to setup he drop box menu, or whichever tool they choose to use, they should make sure that they are getting accurate information. I have never had an issue with filling out personal information but, I definitely think that it is an issue that is often overlooked or ignored. This could end up because something that hurts people who do not have a specified category and are forced to select the "other" option.

I went on twee-q.com to check out what my rating were for retweeting. My Twee-Q was 8.4 which means that I have retweeted 45% men and 55% women, which i can accept as decent. Most of the time, the gender of the person I am retweeting has absolutely nothing to do with why I am retweeting the tweet however, it is good to know that I am unconsciously keeping a near-even Twee-Q. 

Student

In regards to the drop box problem, I often don’t see a reason for identifying your gender or sexual orientation. As for times when it is necessary to fill these items out, I definitely think there should be more options instead of just forcing people to identify as “other”. The option of being able to type in yourself what you identify with is nice, but I think these options should already be there for the most part.

 When I am writing posts or retweeting others gender, race, or sexual orientation do not enter my head at all. I would consider myself pretty neutral when it comes to what I post on social media. I don’t think it should affect peoples’ posts, unless they are focusing in on certain topics with which one of these categories applies more than the other. 

 

 

Student

I think the drop box thing should be solved quickly. Our country is a melting pot, and I can remember my first standardized test had me classifying myself to one race. When Children grow up like this it just helps keep segregation among different races by making them choose who they are. I do believe that there should be drop boxes that you can pick multiple races or statuses of your life because no one wants to classify themself as one thing. 

For twitter, I feel like I retweet whatever I like based on gender. I probably follow girls more because I have more girl friends but I'm not really sure if I retweet them more of guys more. 

Student

When I fill out forms, I just think I want to get this done as quickly as possible. I don't really like identifying my race (at times I dont' see the point) and I would never respond to any question about my sexual orientation. Who I choose to be romantically involved with shouldn't affect anything.

Forms can be a touchy issue, but I feel like there is a simple solution. In theory, you could allow users to fill in blank forms and allow them to self-identify as they wish. I realize when it comes to collecting data (or for more serious, governemental forms), this could be an issue—in that case, significantly extend the list of "standardized" terms from which we can choose. Ultimately we may not please everyone, but we can give it a shot.

 

On the note about Twitter, I retweet what information I find interesting. I don't think sex should play into that. 

Student

There is problems with those drop menu's because many people don't attain to the groups that they show simply because we are already considered something in a general consensus. I am Lebanese American which most would define as Arab-American, however ever since a young age everyone considers me white, so when I do fill out these forms i always mark white I've never really thought of choosing the other box. I think it should be more open toward bi-racial groups and other marital statuses, especially when gay-marriage is legal in certain states. 

Student

Being a white straight female, I haven't given much thought into the forms. However, after thinking about it further, it is something that we need to fix. My twitter account was unmeasurable, however, I am in charge of the twitter account for the company I am interning for, and they had a shocking result. The company I, a feminist, am working for retweets primarily men. What is it that makes people see men as smarter, or more capable? As we change our social stigmas in society, the internet needs to follow. The internet is supposed to be ahead of the game, the future, so the drop down  menu options need to be provided on every site. 

Student

When filling out forms and I come across the race check box, I always pause and have to think about what option I should fill out. I am multi-racial so I usually just choose other, but I do believe they should give more specific options. When I retweet or favorite posts on twitter, the gender of the tweeter never crosses my mind. If I retweet someone its solely based on whether or not I find the tweet funny, creative, or if I relate to it in someway. I dont believe that gender inequality should come into play when you're using twitter, but when it comes to filling out forms it should. For those individuals who dont associate themselves with male or female, there should be an option for them to make them more comfortable when filling out the form. This is an interesting topic that I think needs to be discussed more, especially in todays world. 

Student

This post was extremely interesting to read and lead me to think about how I use twitter more than I ever have before. I don't believe that I discriminate against certain people when I choose to favorite things or retweet things. I believe that I just favorite and retweet things that I find interesting and/or funny. I also retweet things that I think my followers would enjoy reading. The first part about this post was interesting too. I think drop-down menus really keep us closed off and don't allow for people to freely express how they feel about themselves. I don't entirely relate to this as I identify as white caucasian, but I do believe we should eliminate the dropdown menu and add in a box where you can type whatever it is that you want.

Student

For me gender and race doesn't reallly come into my mind in terms of retweeting and favorites. If something is worth retweeting, things like race and gender should be irrelevant. I don't try to appeal to a certain group specifically. I will write about a topic and if someone likes it, great. Being that I am a guy and write about sports a lot, naturally my content will most likely appeal to males more than females.

Student

I find this topic very interesting because I myself am a straight, white male so I never have any issues picking my race, gender or sexual standing. However, as mentioned, there are a great deal of people who like you said, are between two races and don't have an option to pick. I believe that drop boxes should give you the ability to type in your own response, especially when identifying race or sex, as people could be either mixed races or trans-gender. In regards to twitter, im sure my Twee-Q isnt perfect but I do believe it is generally pretty evenly distributed between males and females. I never discriminiate race or sex when it comes to Twitter. For me it's simple, if I see a tweet I believe is funny and/or interesting then I am going to retweet it to my followers, regardless of sex or race. 

Student

This is an interesting topic to because I come from a mixed family.  My mom is European and my dad is from Asia.  I noticed when I would fill out college applications and it said to identify what my race is, I wasn't sure what to do.  What it really come down to what would look better on my application? Saying I was Cucasian or Asian American.  In my eyes it is unfair to ask people when their background is unless you either let they click more than onr box, or like Dave said, have there be a drop menu so you can type in whatever you want.  Inequailty is a much bigger issue than people think it is today.  It is almost impossible to say that your world has never seen racism, discrimination, or sexism.

Student

When filling out forms, gender inequality, race, or sexual orientation do not really pass through my mind. I read the question, find my answer in the drop down box, and move on. Not much thought goes into it.

When tweeting, I want to believe I follow, tweet back, or retweet both men and women equally without any discrimination on their race or sexual orientation. I have friends of different races so it's natural that I interact with them on social media since they consume some of my followers/following. When on Twitter, I retweet when I find compelling, informative, or funny whether it be from a boy or girl. Again, not much thought goes into it. However, with the current world of social media and trying to maintain a professional presence, I try to be somewhat alert to what I publish on my Twitter or Facebook when it comes to race, gender inequality, and sexual orientation.

Student

I found this to be really interesting because up until reading this, I had not thought about these topics very much. I didn't think about if I was following more males or females or who I was paying attention to more. I think that a lot of it has to do with what each person uses the social media for. I use it to follow my friends, and celebrities, things or companies I am interested in and some news. I thnk this infulences it a lot, I am in a sorority so I already have way more girl followers and follow many more girls then guys because these are my close friends. I also follow more female celebrities because I am more interested in what they are doing/posting about as a girl and a fan. I am also interested in fashion so most of those are girls too because of the industry and who is doing their social media. I had not thought about any of this though until reading this post. I think that it is really intersting, I am not surprised that males are retweeted more though. I feel as though they might me more daring on what they tweet. I also had not thought about filling out forms, there is always a place for me to fill it out and I didnt notice how many differnet races or orientations were missing becasue I was not looking for them. When filling out forms, it gets so repetitive its like second nature to just do the same thing every time without really thinking. I think having a place to fill in an option would be really helpful, this way those who need to wouldnt feel so left out of society and those collecting the information would not end with a large group of "others" which leaves lots of room for questioning. 

Student

As a straight white male who was raised in a town that really lacked diversity this is not something that is always on my mind.  Although since coming to college I have been exposed and a have been able to appreciate a more diverse group of people.  When I have to fill out boxes it is very easy to find the ones that describe me.  When I tweet I normally make sure I don’t offend anyone in general and try to keep things positive.  I also find that I retweet more things from guys because it is easier to relate with them and generally I would say the girls that I follow are more inclined to retweet other girls.

 

Student

I went through my Twitter and I do tend to follow males more than females and to investigate even further I've only retweeted four women. But I also do not use my Twitter like I use my Facebook or LinkedIn. which could be a the reason why I haven't retweeted alot of women. But I do agree with the your relationship point. They need to catagorize it better or allow for a written response. I know at one my jobs instead of spouse they say partner when filling out your information. I like that they don't refer to your signiciant other as a husband or wife.

Student

I’ve came across the race/ethnicity problem many times when I was growing up. See I was adopted, and raised by a Mexican family, but later on I find out I’m a good percentage Native American. So what do I fill out American Indian, Non-White, Hispanic, White (not of Hispanic origin)? Which is biologically true, but I was raised all my life with Hispanic culture and norms, so environmentally speaking I am Hispanic. So I’ve filled out all the above lots of times when I was younger. It would be nice to see what you suggested about the combo boxes, because let’s face it many of are compiled of more than one race, it just seems right to be able to combine everything that makes up “you”. As for tweeting, I honestly don’t tweet as much as I should but I don’t really ever take into account who I’m tweeting more of. It’s honestly probably males, and male sports figures, because we share the same hobbies. I don’t think it’s inequality or anything of that sort, just who you connect more with.

Instructor

Perfect example of the race issue, Troy. Thanks for sharing.

 

As for your point about connecting, yes, it is who we connect with and if you happen to have a single gender dominance in your interests, you will get that. My point was more to wake everyone up to the fact that many of us simply don't pay attention to our actions but others might.

Student

When I am writing my own posts via twitter, retweeting others, or filling out forms, I rarely think about gender inequality. Usually if it is a tweet that is obviously discriminating towards any group, then the way that it may affect those groups does cross my mind and I will think twice before retweeting it. To be honest I don't really use media outlets to express my thoughts or concerns about certain things. 

Student

I have not thought about gender inequalities while posting a tweet but I have thought about it when it comes to filling out forms or posts on Facebook. I am a White Caucasians but where I am from in Florida, most of my friends are a mixed-race like Cuban-American. I have always wondered what they fill out on standardized tests or surveys. I hardly ever see that as an option.

America is the melting pot of the world; there are so many races, mix-races, sexual orientations and gender identities in this nation so I agree that there should be an option to fill out what you identify yourself as. I know it may cause a lot of problems for the government but the reality is there is not one word to define a person anymore. The demographics have expanded and the government needs to take notice on that.  

 

Student

For me generally I do not think of those things when tweeting. I think it depends on the person and how they feel they belong in today's society. Maybe some girls care more about what a girl thinks than a guy or more what guys think than girls so is nervous to retweet something that a guy would seem as "typical girl". I personally do not care if I like a tweet then I will retweet it or favorite it. I usually do not think of gender ineqaulity when I fill out forms because I feel that we have become a society that looks at males and females equally. Recently I have had to take a survey and they actually did have male female or transgender. Also, they had the typical race orientations and if you did not fit one there was other: and you could fill in the blank. I do think a lot of people can be closed minded and not even realize that just because they fit into the typical survey forms that other people do not. I do think that it should. Times have changed a lot since our parents have gone to school and what was accepted back then and I think that forms should change as well. 

Student

When I'm filling out forms I think the most about racial equality, it's easy for me to fill out because I'm white but what about people of mixed race or people who don't identify with a category. There should be an option with other, where one can type in what he/she consider his/herself. I haven't really thought about gender or sexual orientation because a lot of forms now have male, female, or transgender options. 

Student

This is something I do encounter everyday online.

And I would say these phenomenon do make me feel awkard when I am filling out things,

even with some surveys from our Psychology department. (You think they'll know better...)

Student

Gender inequality and this type of thing doesn't generally cross my mid. I am a straight white male raised in a middle class family so it is definitely hard for me to relate to these issues. Not to say I am blind to diverse groups of people. I feel I have had the opportunity and privilege to be subjected to a lot of different types of people and places and I am very grateful for that. When it comes to filling out forms, my boxes I need to check are always there so I have never pondered the thought you bring up. When it comes to retweeting men and women, I honestly could give a damn if I retweet men or women more. I retweet content that I find useful, funny, or interesting. Whether it is from a man or woman never crosses my mind and most likely never will.

Student

I find that on twitter, I retweet and favorite more tweets that girls write--not boys. Mainly, I think this is just because I can relate to what they're saying more. I agree that most general forms are very flawed, and not all that dependable. You don't have to tell the truth about your country of origin. As long as you "associate" with them, you can put whichever ethnicity you want. Certain schools give perks or allow easier entrance to students of a certain ethnicity. You could simply say you're latino, or from out of the US, and they aren't allowed to question you. I agree that on forms it should be strictly fill-in-the-blank. But even more, I don't think all of this matters as much as people make it matter. Gay, straight, male, female, latino, black, asian...who cares?

Student

When I post on social media sites I don’t really think about sexual orientation, race, or gender inequality. What I am mostly thinking about is not offending someone. I normally don’t post that much anyway. But when I do post, I use Twitter more than any other social media site. I think I post more on Twitter because it is easier to express an opinion or feeling on Twitter than any other site. That being said I don’t normally post anything that is controversial. On the other hand when filling out forms I do think about race and sexual orientation more because I notice that there aren’t many options on these forms and a lot of people end up choosing the “other” option. I think these forms should provide more options to choose from, so not as many people have to choose the “other” option.

Student

This article talks about a serious problem that I never came out. When I am writing posts, retweeting or filling out forms I rarely consider gender, race or sexual problems. Everything seems to have the only answer. Female and asian. Actually, when I saw the option "other", I sometimes wondering if it is useful or someone really put "other" in that option. Or once time I saw a male friend put "female" on gender option, I just thought he was funny. But after I read this article, I realize that the  society is full of diversity. And I think forms should develop to have more options but not limited into the "other" category. As I finally knew that male friend is a gay but there is no such an option appropriate for him. The lake of options will cause misunderstanding as what I did. People are willing to introduce themselves as who they really are so the diversity of options is necessary. I also think the social networking is a good place to share our thoughts and get to know new things. And the Twee-Q makes me think does it matters for people tend to retweet males more? As the Twee-Q shows, the average Twee-Q is 4.5 which means people tweet male more. But why? I think it might because the male users post more interesting things than females? Or male users can more easily attract people's eyes and be active on social media. But the main reason is waiting for us to figure out.

Student

I have been using social media such as Facebook and Twitter for a while, but I rarely use them to share my thoughts. Probably the main reason is that I have seen so many people wrote something irrelevant on their post. Irrelevant post contains contents related to gender inequality, racial discrimination. The post written by famous celebrities usually creates more controversy. As I said, I do not tweet or facebook much, but when I do that, I try not to use any terminology that is related to gender inequality and racial discrimination. That is because I still understand how my Facebook/Twitter may influence someone that I even don't know. Even in PR/advertising perspective, their content should include gender equality and no racial discrimination because the content will be seen by everyone. 

Student

As a person of mixed ethnicity, I can relate to how irritating and confusing it is to fill out the race forms. Do I generalize or do I select the other category? I never really thought too much about gender identity though, but it is something that I think we need to consider these days. It must be hard to fill out forms when there is no option that seems fitting. I feel like it would be easier and more accurate if there was a way for people to choose their own options rather than be given a select few options to choose from. As far as posts and tweeting I have not thought about gender inequality, because people enjoy reading tweets that they are interested in. Personally, most of the people I follow are females and that is because of things that I am interested just happen to be more female related. 

 

Student

I have seen articles before about altering demographic information on college acceptance information and have always thought that is a good idea. I understand the need for collecting demographic information, but have never really considered the impact it may have on others filling out the information. I believe the information that is being collected is extremely useful to marketers and advertisers but can be arranged in a more culturally friendly way.

 

Student

When I am writing posts, retweeting others or filling out forms, gender inequality rarely enters my mind; however, I make sure that my posts would not offend anyone before I post something on social media. Twitter is a great place to go to share your thoughts, but I feel like people tend to abuse it at times by crossing the line of what is and is not appropriate for social media. It is okay to have your opinions; however, I think it is important to keep some thoughts to yourself if you believe it might offend someone.  As far as filling out forms go, I never really realized how many people are in the "other" category. I believe forms should expand their options to choose from so that people do not have to fall into the "other" category. 

Student

When I am using social media I don't normally consider gender, race or sexual orientation inequality besides refraining from using terms that are considered degrading or saying things that would offend people. I think social issues lay in an odd gray area when it comes to social issues. On one hand, there is that whole freedom of speech thing and I believe people should be able to use social media to express themselves freely. But, on the other hand the whole "social" aspect of social media makes these types of information outlets very dangerous. Yes the US honors the concept of freedom of speech, but does that mean that people should be able to post things that are verbally degrading or hurtful towards others? I think this is especially important when considering how accessible the internet is to all age groups, especially to extremely influential young adults. 

 

I think I have always been somewhat aware of the lack of flexibility in ethnicity options on forms. However, after attending a conference on gender and sexuality I have become aware that not everyone fits into a sexual orientation or gender category often defined by our government. I think this is personally detrimental to segments of the society that do not feel they are being represented or do not feel like they are being given the option to identify themselves correctly. Someone who's shape does not fit perfectly into the outlines established by our society might feel that who they are is wrong. Especially for our country, "the melting pot", I would assume we would make more of an effort to make everyone feel comfortable in their own skin.

Student

Also, this seems fitting. 

Student

I'm glad this blog was posted. I have always been very aware of gender and sexual equality because growing up my grandmother always talked to me and my sister about it. I've come to realize the times I am most aware of it is in social situations and when filling out forms where I have to describe myself as white or black, single or married. I always want to put "other" simply because being categorized makes me feel uncomfortable and I don't see why it should matter what race I am or who I am dating. Putting labels on people just leads to greater segragation and inequality. I put my Twitter handle into Twee-Q and came to realize that I retweet men more than women which I believe to be unintentional but interesting to think about. I have not thought about gender equality in the past when I tweet or when I post articles on Facebook, etc. but now thinking about it I can see where the problem lies, it is not in the obvious cases of gender and sexual equality but in the cases where we are just going with the motions and NOT thinking about it. We need to be more equal and conscious of our choices each day and create a more equal society through awareness of how we approach social media.

Student

It is really something to think about that we are still having these kinds of issues today. It's unfortunate that people can't really put the truth down for who they really are. People focus on the real life, tangible instances, and small shortcomings like this still occur on the internet. You do take it for granted when you can actually identify with the options given, where as others sometimes cannot. I do not like categorizing yourself for applications and things of that nature. These are supposed to keep things fair, when in reality it doesn't. There should be a more conscious effort to change these things. We can all do our part by trying to be more consciously aware of how we categorize people, how we do it, and help push for a change.

Student

This post opened my eyes to a problem that had never popped into my head before, so I found this to be very interesting.

 

For one, I do fall into the described straight, white mold and never ventured to think what others must go through when filling out the ever-popular gender/race/marital status form. Putting more thought into it, I think that a more open-ended solution is needed and agree with the check box selection method that was described in the post.

 

Retweeting is something that I rarely do and when I do it is usually something that is news/sports related and does not have a gender to go along with it. But to be honest, when that does come up I do not give a second thought to the gender of the tweeter. I would be curious to see my score as well.

 

I don’t think that the thought of who you are retweeting should cross your mind but rather pass on the information that you would like to pass on. Is it a big deal that more male messages are being seen? Is it impacting our lives that much or hurt the female gender? I’m not sure of these answers but would love to hear some research on the topic.

Student

Last semester in my required social science class, the topic of race and gender was discussed a lot.  Our professor always thought it was crazy that not every race was covered on questionnaires.  I do have to agree, no one should feel awkward or embarassed by not fitting in a category when filling those things out.  When I fell out forms gender, race, and sexual orientation are never a problem because my category is always provided.  I also never pay much attention to whether I retweet a male or female.  For me I do not necessarily see or notice gender.  It is important when you are tweeting or posting that you pay attention and do not post anything insensitive to make other people feel uncomfortable.

Student
This is definitely an interesting topic that I have never really given time to think about. Looking back now, all the exam in elementary and middle school I hated filling in the bubbles about being male or female, white or African American, but now, obviously they all have their purposes. But it definitely is derogatory. Also, some options on my Facebook I left blank simply because I chose not to answer them. However, I went to the Twee-Q website as well, thinking that I had no idea which gender I retweeted the most and was interested to find out that I scored a 4.8/10, meaning I retweet 68% males and 32% females. heyhis really doesnt mean too much to me considering I dont really pay attention to if it is a male or female I am retweeting. I guess I have more male people on twitter, or simply put, they are more interesting. Probably because I follow Barney Stinson and he is hilarious.
Student

I have noticed over the past few years that many of the options on surveys for race and gender has changed. It has become much more diverse than when I was in middle school. They have added races such as Pacific Islander, Mixed race, Hispanic or Latino, American Indian and black or african-american. That has come a long way in the past few years, but yes I agree with you that they should add a box where you are able to either write in your race or type in your race. Since I am white I dont always think about how it would feel to have to check 'other' in every survey you took. I would feel awful.I also agree with you with the whole "single, married, divorced." I have been in a relationship for the past three years and I dont like to check 'single' because thats not true. Im not sure what that effects when answering surveys. Now that gay marraige is legal in many states there most definitely needs to be a box to check that, people are proud of their accomplishments and we need to showcase that. I decided to look at my twitter account and my retweets and found that i rarely reteweet males. Maybe i am weird haha but almost all of my retweets were females and females accounts. 

Dave Linabury's picture
Instructor
2/13/2014
Blog, Twitter